The Lincolnshire Naturalists’ Union

The Lincolnshire Naturalists’ Union was founded in 1893 and they have over a hundred years’ experience and information in Lincolnshire’s wildlife and geology.

In that time they have seen the county change almost beyond recognition, and have a wealth of observations on just how those changes have affected our wildlife – made on over 800 field meetings all over the county.

The LNU Headquarters are based in Horncastle, Lincolnshire. Telephone: 01507 526667 Email: info@lnu.org


2017 Field Meetings
This meeting to a private ancient woodland site was courtesy of Steph and Steve Simpson and was led by Brian Hedley and attended by an excellent turn-out of 21 people on a dry and partly sunny afternoon. A few people stayed on for an evening bat recording session led by… Read More>>>

2016 Field Meetings
Joint LNU / South Lincolnshire Flora Group field meeting led by Sarah Lambert and Richard Jefferson. Attended by 37 people whom split into two groups. A fairly cold but mainly sunny afternoon. Over 140 plant species were recorded including… Read More>>>

2015 Field Meetings
Annual LNU fungi foray led by Ray Halstead and attended by 26 people on a cool but bright autumn afternoon. A restricted range of fungi were noted but did include excellent displays of collared earth-star Geastrum triplex next to paths. Other species included snowy inkcap Coprinus niveus which grows… Read More>>>

2014 Field Meetings
Annual fungi foray led by Ray Halstead and attended by 20 people and a dry and mainly sunny afternoon. At least 45 fungi species were recorded in a couple of hours and amongst those were some really special finds, most notably, Oak Maze-gill Daedalea quercina, Pleurotus dryinus and Fluted Bird’s-nest Fungus Cyathus striatus. A fantastic find was…Read More>>>

2013 Field Meetings
An afternoon plus evening meeting courtesy of landowners Bryan and Liz Libell to their large garden and surrounding farmland. Led by Brian Hedley and attended by 15 people. A dry, windy, warm and mainly sunny afternoon with winds easing by the evening.
Over 200 plant species were noted including… Read More>>>